Tuesday, March 04, 2014

Is Breast Feeding Really Better? Of Course It Is...

Have a look at My recent posting on my website
which responds to an article in today's New York Times Well Blog entitled Is Breast Feeding Really Better?

 The bottom line? There are well documented benefits to the immune system for the immune system that this study fails to address, and there could well be emotional benefits for both mother and child that this study all fails to investigate.

More in the links above about how Chinese medicine views breast feeding relative to breast health and the acupuncture channels.



copyright Eyton J. Shalom, M.S., L.Ac. San Diego, CA All Rights Reserved, Use With Permission Ayurveda, Acupuncture, and Chinese Medicine in San Diego http://www.bodymindwellnesscenter.com

Friday, January 24, 2014

Feeling Hot Can Fuel Rage--Ayurveda, Chinese Medicine, and Science

In English we refer to someone with a bad temper as a hot head, hot headed, hot tempered. When I was a boy and I would get impatient Mom would say, "keep your shirt on!" which was another way of saying don't get so hot around the collar that you need to take your shirt off.

There are many more examples of this in the English and other languages from Homer to Shakespeare to Arthur Miller, but the key point is one that both Chinese Medicine and Ayuveda have always made--anger and its associated feelings--irritability, frustration, rage, are all associated with physical sensations/manifestations  of heat--and these symptoms can range from the obvious, like the flushed face and red eyes of the rage-aholic or angry alcoholic, to more indirect ones, like the tossing and turning of the insomniac frustrated with their day or their relationships. 

In Chinese medicine pathological heat is either due to infectious pathogens, like viral illnesses, or to internal causes, namely the heat that builds up due to frustration and anger, exactly the kind of heat that we see with what is now called stress. Chinese medicine describes the mechanism by which this heat builds very elegantly as the result of " Liver Depression Qi Stagnation," and also as the  flaring of Ministerial Fire. Ayuveda describes in terms of dosha, as Pitta elevation.

But stress is a misnomer. What we call stress is actually the bodymind response to stressors. And each bodymind type responds differently in Ayurveda and Chinese Medicine. Pitta types, dominated by fire, have a tendency to respond to things they don't like, such as the red light in traffic, or the server who brought the wrong food, or any case where they did not get their way, with intensity, aggression, tension, that is to say the fire of intensity. Especially a Pitta with unresolved emotional issues will react thusly, which is why what in Buddhism is called Mental Culture is so important; being taught as a child how to react wisely to the things you have aversion to. It really does help to have wise parents and the good fortune of a happy, loving, safe childhood. Those of us who did not have that need to learn how to adjust accordingly.

What is interesting as that excessive heat in the bodymind, whether due to an infectious agent such as a virus, whether due to emotive states such as anger, or simply whether just due to one's natural bodymind type, Pitta in Ayurveda, or whether due to allowing one's Pitta to elevate, regardless of type, all produce  similar symptoms--

  • Visible Redness, such as in inflammation or infection, as in skin disorders like eczema
  • Restlessness, such as in insomnia or fever
  • Irritability, as in fever, frustration, or anger
  • Elevated Temp, as in fever or menopause
  • Subjective sense of heat, as in eczema, menopause, or feeling very frustrated
  • Palpable heat, as in rheummotoid arthritis, sports injury, fever, sunburn, skin disease

Now comes this article in the Scientific American demonstrating that feeling hot can fuel rage and that elevated climatic temps (think about how road rage increases in summer in southern California) has been historically associated with increased violence, both between individuals and between groups.

I love it when Science confirms Chinese Medicine and Ayuveda's theories.



copyright Eyton J. Shalom, M.S., L.Ac. San Diego, CA Jan 2014, All Rights Reserved, Use With Permission Ayurveda, Acupuncture, and Chinese Medicine in San Diego http://www.bodymindwellnesscenter.com

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Oil Bath in Ayurveda: Foundation of Healthy Living

Great new article on Oil Bath in Ayurveda on my blog at BodyMind Wellness Center. Ayurvedic Oil Bath article.


 More coming soon!

copyright Eyton J. Shalom, M.S., L.Ac. San Diego, CA All Rights Reserved, Use With Permission Ayurveda, Acupuncture, and Chinese Medicine in San Diego http://www.bodymindwellnesscenter.com

Monday, July 15, 2013

GINGER ROOT FOR ASTHMA

In Chinese Medicine asthma is most often considered cold trapped in the Lungs. Even when the symptoms are of a hot type, such as heat sensations and dark phlgem, once you clear the heat with herbs, you need to deal with the underlying cold.

That is why in all cultures with natural medicine Asthma was treated with hot type plasters, like mustard plaster.

People with asthma typically have weak lungs. When the lungs are weak you are more prone to cold and cold gets in and gets trapped.

I don't believe in panaceas, but if i did believe in one, it would be Ginger. Fresh ginger root is one of the most valuable additions to the American or European diet, because it stimulates the digestive fire, called Agni in Ayurveda. Long pepper is also excellent.

Ginger powder is very valuable in tea, along with long pepper and cinnamon and other spices like Ajwain. Its ginger powder that is used in both Ayurvedic and Chinese Herbal Medicine formulas for Asthma. One of my favorites is Ayush Brand Tylaphora Plus.

Now comes this research that shows that purified extracts of ginger when combined with beta antagonists relax smooth muscles in the airways and achieve a bronchodilating effect.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/20/ginger-asthma-beta-agonists-medications_n_3295080.html


Copyright Eyton J. Shalom, M.S., L.Ac. San Diego, CA All Rights Reserved, Use With Permission Ayurveda, Acupuncture, and Chinese Medicine in San Diego http://www.bodymindwellnesscenter.com

Sunday, July 14, 2013

Cupping for Pain and Sport's Injuries

 Great new article on how Cupping works the relief of muscular, myofascial and trigger point pain, as well as in the treatment of Sport's Injuries and to as part of a conditioning regime, from both the Classical Chinese Medicine and Science perspectives. Check it out!

http://bodymindwellnesscenter.com/cupping-for-pain-and-in-sports-medicine/

copyright Eyton J. Shalom, M.S., L.Ac. San Diego, CA All Rights Reserved, Use With Permission Ayurveda, Acupuncture, and Chinese Medicine in San Diego http://www.bodymindwellnesscenter.com

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Healthy Summer Fruit Tart You Can Be Proud Of

Summer is blooming, if not quite here, literally, in San Diego with our recent heat wave, it is in the imagination-- the season of flowers and fruit and fruit tart. Make yours the healthy way. Food, not candy.


http://bodymindwellnesscenter.com/healthy-summer-fruit-tart/

copyright Eyton J. Shalom, M.S., L.Ac. San Diego, CA All Rights Reserved, Use With Permission Ayurveda, Acupuncture, and Chinese Medicine in San Diego http://www.bodymindwellnesscenter.com

Friday, May 03, 2013

Baked Eggs Middle Eastern Style: Shakshuka

Great way to make eggs that is not fried and has more vegetables. Baked eggs are really creamy. Use free range eggs. By me, I don't use peppers, and if you are a Pitta type, don't you either; I do use carrots or kale or collards, the latter two help balance the dish and pacify Pitta. Adding coriander powder to the spices will help keep Pitta down, as will topping with Cilantro vs. Parsley. All told though this dish will increase Pitta, so don't make it if you have a strong physical Pitta imbalance.

But its a very good dish for Vatta types, provided they delete the peppers and paprika and cook the onions till sweet. Cumin and Black Pepper are good

For Kapha, no feta cheese,and use the peppers and paprika and maybe even some red chili.

P.S.  the way she drops the powdered spices flat on the hot pan, they will burn, drop them into olive oil or the veggies and stir.

Video from NY Times Chef: How to make Shakshuka 




copyright Eyton J. Shalom, M.S., L.Ac. San Diego, CA All Rights Reserved, Use With Permission Ayurveda, Acupuncture, and Chinese Medicine in San Diego http://www.bodymindwellnesscenter.com

Monday, April 29, 2013

The Acu-Ball, a Great Tool for Trigger Point Pain and Myofascial Pain

 Here is my new post on using a great device called the acuball, or acu-ball, developed by Dr. Michael Cohen, as seen on Dr. Oz., endorsed by Deepak Chopra, and now me, but with a lot more specifics. Here is a link to my article,

http://bodymindwellnesscenter.com/acuball-for-the-treatment-and-prevention-of-trigger-point-pain/ ,

and here is Dr. Cohen's acu-ball website


copyright Eyton J. Shalom, M.S., L.Ac. San Diego, CA All Rights Reserved, Use With Permission Ayurveda, Acupuncture, and Chinese Medicine in San Diego http://www.bodymindwellnesscenter.com

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Mindfulness, Trigger Point Pain, Myofascial Acupuncture, and the Anti-inflammatory Diet

Just posted this article on Acupuncture, Trigger Point Pain, Mindfulness, and the Anti-inflammatory Diet on my Website:

http://bodymindwellnesscenter.com/trigger-point-pain-acupuncture-mindfulness-and-the-anti-inflammatory-diet/

In which I discuss the different pieces of the myofascial pain puzzle, diet-inflammation, mental tension/stress and muscular tension.

Tension originates in the mind and influences inflammation and pain perception, whereas diet affects systemic inflammation more directly. Check it out!

Copyright Eyton J. Shalom, M.S., L.Ac. San Diego, CA All Rights Reserved, Use With Permission Ayurveda, Acupuncture, and Chinese Medicine in San Diego
http://www.bodymindwellnesscenter.com

Sunday, April 07, 2013

Are Calcium Supplements Wise for Post Menopausal Women?

Americans seem to think that everything can be solved with a pill. Whereas in Chinese Medicine it says that only after diet and lifestyle have failed do we utilize drug medicine.

Vitamin and Mineral supplements fall somewhere inbetween. They are clearly no substitute for a healthy diet rich in green leafy vegetables, yellow starchy ones, fruits, probiotic rich fermented foods, bone broths, nuts, seeds, and a little bit of everything else.

Interesting article here from Jane Brody, health writer from the New York Times on Calcium supplementation for post-menopausal women.

In February, the United States Preventive Services Task Force recommended that postmenopausal women refrain from taking supplemental calcium and vitamin D. After reviewing more than 135 studies, the task force said there was little evidence that these supplements prevent fractures in healthy women.
Moreover, several studies have linked calcium supplements to an increased risk of heart attacks and death from cardiovascular disease.

And here is a quote from this article.

A government task force formally recommended on Monday that healthy postmenopausal women avoid taking low daily doses of vitamin D and calcium to ward off bone fractures.
 This does not apply to women with osteoporosis, however. One thing is clear, and i have seen a number of studies on this. Vegetable calcium from leafy green vegetables cooked with an acidic substance like lemon, vinegar, etc. is more absorbable.  So at a minimum, don't count on your calcium from dairy, make sure you eat your greens.






http://www.bodymindwellnesscenter.com